Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of teaching in rural Georgia in 1841-1842, descriptions of Southern life, slaves, linguistic differences, and cuisine

Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...
Journals of Hiram Howland, including a long detailed account of...

2 volumes, both sheep-backed marbled boards (8 inches high), the first from 1838 when Howland was teaching at New Paltz Academy in NY: fourteen students have written him farewell poems (some might be cribbed from published authors), followed by a 19 pp. handwritten speech on the importance of education for all, including slaves, a several page list of students taught at New Paltz in 1838-39, a 7-page 'Resolution' to end slavery directed to the President, with many of the arguments made by abolitionists of the time, plus a few other pages of poetry, a recipe for cologne, etc. Quite a bit of dampstaining which has also caused some of the ink to run, this first journal in fair condition only. The second volume is in better condition, no dampstaining, contains some French lessons to start, and then begins a journal from November 3rd, 1841 of a year spent teaching school in Jackson County, Georgia (NW of Athens), leaving from his uncle Seneca Howland's house in Poughkeepsie and describing in considerable detail the voyage from there to NYC where he found berth on a ship headed south. The sea-going part of the trip is recounted in some detail (he was seasick most of the time), including sights along the way (Cape Hatteras, Fort Pinckney) and, once ashore, a fine description of Charleston, South Carolina, its architecture, slaves, African-American life, cuisine, etc. He then describes the journey by rail, horse and carriage to Jackson County, GA, including details about Danielsville, Athens, Augusta, etc. His descriptions of slave and African-American life are very detailed and insightful, as are his descriptions of southern cuisine, architecture, and village life. Perhaps the most interesting part of this journal are several pages of lists of words and phrases, showing the difference between New York's and Georgia's terminology, possibly one of the earliest written accounts of such linguistic differences. Another funny passage is when he hears tell of a wonderful schoolhouse in nearby Athens area, and takes a day off to go see it. Needless to say, his ironic description of the schoolhouse (with holes so large that he could toss his hat through them, and a chimney so leaky that alligators could pass through with ease) is a fine piece of amused disappointment. There is a lively discussion of how southerners eat, too, with an emphasis on the lack of shortening in their baked goods, and a lovely description of biscuits. He also devotes pages to descriptions of southern life for slaves, how they could not travel without passes, and how 'patrollers' who caught slaves out at night had the right to thrash or whip them, and that these patrollers went out every evening and were composed mainly of local militia. The journal entries comprise about 30 pages. He describes the trip back to Uncle Seneca's house in Poughkeepsie, and the rest of the journal is mainly the role-sheets of names of his students in Washington, NY from 1843 to 1847. A terrific pair of journals of an observant teacher who had liberal ideas about education and the abolishment of slavery with excellent details about life in ante-bellum Georgia. Good.

Item #H4221

Price: $1,500.00